About TIM

What is Traffic Incident Management (TIM)?
According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), TIM is a planned and coordinated multi-disciplinary process to detect, respond to, and clear traffic incidents so that traffic flow may be restored as safely and quickly as possible. Effective TIM reduces the duration and impacts of traffic incidents and improves the safety of motorists, crash victims and emergency responders.
Who is involved in TIM?
Traffic Incident Management is a planned and coordinated program process to detect, respond to, and remove traffic incidents and restore traffic capacity as safely and quickly as possible. This process requires collaboration among a number of public and private sector partners, including, but not limited to, Emergency Management, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Fire/Rescue, Hazardous Materials Responders, Law Enforcement, Medical Examiners and Coroners, Public Safety Communications, Towing and Recovery, Traffic Information Media, and Transportation.
What are the benefits to TIM?
TIM practices enable efficient and effective response during routine incident response and major emergencies. Traffic incidents happen frequently and differ from major emergencies primarily in scale. The responding partners are the same. Safe and effective coordinated multi-agency actions taken to quickly clear traffic incidents depend upon a high degree of institutional and technical coordination and cooperation among a large number of agencies and private sector responding parties. The better prepared public safety, transportation and private sector partners are to effectively responding to and resolving traffic incidents the better prepared they will also be to handling major emergencies when they occur.

About TIM Training

DO I HAVE TO BE AN IAFC MEMBER TO ATTEND TRAINING?
No, all are welcome to take the training.
HOW DO I REGISTER FOR TRAINING
Visit Training (by state, by date) to see training events in your area. If there is not one available, please contact us at traffic@iafc.org.
I am interested in becoming a trainer.
Please contact the IAFC at traffic@iafc.org for more information about becoming a trainer. Please provide name, department, contact information, and current resume.
I am interested in hosting a training session.
Please contact the IAFC at traffic@iafc.org for more information about hosting about training sessions.
What is covered during a TIM training session?
The National Traffic Incident Management Responder Training Program (L12/L32) was built on the concept that the longer first responders remain on a traffic incident scene, the greater risk they, and the traveling public, face. In 2012, the U.S. Fire Administration reported seven struck-by deaths among firefighters. Traffic incidents are the number one cause of death for EMS/EMTs and for law enforcement officers. The TIM responder training program addresses the need for collaboration amount incident responders. The training promotes 3 major goals: Responder safety, Safe, quick clearance, and Prompt, reliable, and interoperable communications.

About the Project

What is the International Association of Fire Chiefs?
The International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) represents the leadership of firefighters and emergency responders worldwide; our members are the world's leading experts in firefighting, emergency medical services, terrorism response, hazardous materials spills, natural disasters, search and rescue, and public safety policy. Since 1873, the IAFC has provided a forum for fire and emergency service leaders to exchange ideas, develop professionally and uncover the latest products and services available to first responders.
What is SHRP2?
The Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2) was created by Congress to address the challenges of moving people and goods efficiently and safely on the Nation's highways. SHRP 2 has delivered two products to improve traffic incident on-scene management. The first product is a multi-disciplinary training course that promotes a shared understanding of the requirements for quick clearance and safeguards responders and motorists. The second product is a 2-day Train-the-Trainer course that facilitates widespread use of the multi-disciplinary training. SHRP 2 addresses four strategic focus areas, including safety (the role of human behavior in highway safety), renewal (more efficient highway project delivery), reliability (congestion reduction through improved travel times), and capacity (improved integration of community, economic, and environmental considerations for new highway capacity). Visit the FHWA website for more information (http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/fhwahop12007/index.htm).

Project Objectives

The International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC), in partnership with Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is working to bring training needed by the fire service and other emergency responders regarding traffic incident management. FHWA has developed, under the Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2), training programs geared at improving the safety of first responders in traffic incident scenes.

The training promotes:

  • Responder Safety
  • Safe, quick clearence
  • Prompt, reliable, and interoperable communications.

For more information about available training, visit Training.

SHRP2

The Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2) was created by Congress to address the challenges of moving people and goods efficiently and safely on the Nation's highways. SHRP 2 has delivered two products to improve traffic incident on-scene management. The first product is a multi-disciplinary training course that promotes a shared understanding of the requirements for quick clearance and safeguards responders and motorists. The second product is a 2-day Train-the-Trainer course that facilitates widespread use of the multi-disciplinary training. SHRP 2 addresses four strategic focus areas, as determined by FHWA:

  • Safety – The role of human behavior in highway safety.
  • Renewal – More efficient highway project delivery.
  • Reliability – Congestion reduction through improved travel times.
  • Capacity – Improved integration of community, economic, and environmental considerations for new highway capacity.

 For more information about the SHRP2 project, visit http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/fhwahop12007/index.htm